1 Perception: Immersive experiences are scripted productions.

Reality:

Early versions of immersive technologies, which include augmented reality (AR) and virtual reality (VR), resemble their video game forebears in that they are essentially journeys of discovery through different stages of preprogrammed experiences. We can scale virtual cliffs and mountains while riding a roller coaster or stumble over park benches in pursuit of Pokémon Go characters. However, as immersive technologies become imbued with machine learning and AI, digital experiences will become increasingly multisensory, making them more convincingly “real.” For example, Fast Company reports that surgeons can now practice a procedure using VR with a stylus that simulates the feel of operating on an open knee joint. The AR and VR of the future will gather information from the surrounding physical environment and instantly pass it back to an AI for analysis in order to derive unique, in-the-moment responses to our actions.

2 Perception:  You need bulky equipment.

Reality:

We won’t be wearing those silly goggles forever. As the sensors that pick up data from our movements and speech become smaller, they will be easier to embed in everything. Imagine being in a factory in which every object has a visual overlay that lets you drill into information about that object, handle a digital version of it, or control it remotely. Today, firefighters can wear a smart helmet from Qwake Tech that combines AR technology with a thermal imaging camera. The device outlines the edges of objects (such as doors and stairs) and highlights sources of high heat, enabling firefighters to move through buildings more quickly. Companies including BMW are experimenting with advanced gesture recognition technology that would enable users to control devices without having to touch them. You might soon be able to launch a video chat by waving your hand.

3 Perception: A physical presence is required.

Reality:

For now. But before long, you’ll be able to create a VR avatar that looks like you, that sounds like you, and that can meet with your colleagues’ VR avatars in a realistic virtual space. The technology will likely require a brain-computer interface such as a headset or a brain-implanted chip. Neurable has a prototype software platform to power headset sensors that let users maneuver in VR video games using only their thoughts. Given sufficient computing power and a smart enough AI, you may one day be able to program your VR avatar to participate in a virtual meeting, tour the digital twin of a factory, or attend a keynote speech as your proxy and (theoretically) do a good enough job that your colleagues would never guess it wasn’t actually you. That will raise questions about how to tell if an avatar is being controlled live by a human or operated by a bot—and whether to require the differences be obvious.

Source: Digital Economy

Definition: Augmented reality (AR)

AR is a live direct or indirect view of a physical, real-world environment whose elements are „augmented“ by computer-generated perceptual information, ideally across multiple sensory modalities, including visual, auditory, haptic, somatasensory, and olfactory.

The overlaid sensory information can be constructive (i.e. additive to the natural environment) or destructive (i.e. masking of the natural environment) and is spatial registered with the physical world such that it is perceived as an immersive aspect of the real environment. In this way, Augmented reality alters one’s current perception of a real world environment, whereas virtual reality replaces the real world environment with a simulated one. Augmented Reality is related to a synonymous term called computer-mediated reality.

Augmented reality is used to enhance the natural environments or situations and offer perceptually enriched experiences. With the help of advanced AR technologies (e.g. adding computer vision and object recognition) the information about the surrounding real world of the user becomes interactive and digitally manipulable. Information about the environment and its objects is overlaid on the real world. This information can be virtual or real, e.g. seeing other real sensed or measured information such as electromagnetic radio waves overlaid in exact alignment with where they actually are in space.

Augmented reality brings the components of the digital world into a person’s perceived real world. The first functional AR systems that provided immersive mixed reality experiences for users were invented in the early 1990s, starting with the Virtual Fixtures system developed at the U.S. Air Force’s Armstrong Labs in 1992. Another example is an AR helmet for construction workers which display information about the construction sites. reality is also transforming the world of education, where content may be accessed by scanning or viewing an image with a mobile device. Early immersive augmented reality experiences were used in the entertainment and gaming businesses, but now other industries are also getting interested about AR’s possibilities for example in knowledge sharing, educating, managing the information flood and organizing distant meetings.

Augmented reality has a lot of potential in gathering and sharing tacit knowledge. Augmentation techniques are typically performed in real time and in semantic context with environmental elements. Immersive perceptual information is sometimes combined with supplemental information like scores over a live video feed of a sporting event. This combines the benefits of augmented reality technology and heads up display technology (HUD).

Source: Wikipedia

 

Geschrieben von Learning Evolution.com

The basis of my professional, polyvalent career is mainly characterized by the following qualifications: - 20 years of experience in Sales & Marketing - 20 years of experience in the field of ICT and in particular, Learning Development, Knowledge Management (KM), Enterprise Content Management (ECM), Customer Relationship Management (CRM) and Search Engine Optimization (SEO) - 20 years of experience in the field of human Resources Management (5 - 25 persons - recruitment, leading, training and motivation of employees) - 20 years of experience as a Project Manager in the field of ICT, chemical and industrial plant design and architecture. - 10 years of experience in 2D / 3D CAD planning - 10 years of experience in the field of Biological and Energy-Efficient Construction - 5 years of experience as a Member of the Board of two companies, with whom I've worked

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